Project Management in Practice

Beyond the alphabet soup of PRINCE2, MSP, MoP, PMBOK, ITIL, Agile

Useful Project Management Presentations


In this post I have attached some presentations I have done over the years on project management and related topics. As I was looking at my SlideShare uploads, it occurred to me that these can be quite handy for others too. Hopefully it is of benefit to the readers of this blog.

This presentation is on the topic of managed services, presented at the International Esri Distributor Summit in San Diego, CA in July 2013.

The following presentations are two flavours, first one delivered to the PRINCE2 User Group in Wellington regarding benefits of using multiple ideas together. Second is a presentation to internal PMO regarding improvements to existing processes in project management.

The final presentation is one given at an IT conference in Wellington, New Zealand based on experience of enterprise software implementation at a major port in the west coast of the United States.

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Is productivity gains the answer to improved business outcome?


Is productivity gains the answer to improved business outcomeI recently ran into an old school friend. At the time we were nearing the end of high school he was the coolest dude with a job at a fast food place. He had disposable income and an old second hand car. What else do you need in life? Those of us that were planning further studies or apprenticeships got plenty of advice from him on the futility of our endeavours. When someone mentioned better prospects and better pay, he simply said if he ever needed more money he can simply work a few extra hours.

All these years later I was surprised to see him holding training materials. I was intrigued with this change of attitude. At the time some of us were thinking of investing in our future and as a result consciously taking on a few more  years of hardship, he had no appreciation that his circumstances could change. He shared with me his predicament in working harder and harder to support his family. This larger than life character was backed into a corner. It is great to see him sorting his life out.

What has this got to do with business outcomes you may ask? It occurred to me how many organisations take a similar approach to making money. Everyone is in a mad rush to squeeze yet another billable hour out of staff, minimise non-utilised time. The only certainty is that the environments we operate in will change. As my friend found out eventually, there is only so much difference you can make using this approach.

True sustainable change comes when you have the commitment to review your methods, acknowledge the failings and change accordingly.

Image Credit: under30ceo.com

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Building PMO metrics


The Christmas and New Year is always a good time to take some time off the hurly burly of daily grind and reflect on how things are going. Towards the end of the year I did some work on what metrics would help us run our PMO more efficiently. Metrics are always difficult to establish, especially as they only tell a story once you have a baseline to measure against. This is probably a heavy topic for the first post of the year. Apologies for that.

Building-PMO-Metrics

While I see a pressing need for making decisions on evidence, I am also cautious against spurious interpretations of metrics, which can easily happen if taken out of context. You only have to look at statistics driven sports such as baseball or cricket where fans and officials will take diametrically opposing views of players or tactics using different statistics. Numbers are just that. What you interpret from them is what gives them meaning.

The first task was to explore what type of metrics would be useful for our business. I work for a IT professional services firm. It has unique challenges from other types of businesses. I did some research on what other similar organisations are doing. I found this compilation from OpenAir and excellent resource. There are three articles in this and the first one by Thomas Loh is by far the best. This was an excellent start. The key is not to go chasing every metric under the sun, but the ones that you need to measure. That is even more crucial when your PMO is lean and you are in the process of building its maturity. Capturing metrics and analysing them takes effort and time. You cannot afford to be spending either frivolously.

The standard metrics of utilisation, profitability, billing rate etc are quite easy to measure after the effect. We were looking at getting at least one forward looking metric that can help validate our decision making. We decided to invest in our effort in an area that is most challenging for a services business like ours – that is the pull between resource and demand.

Resource-vs-DemandIn services business you either have too much work or too many people. It is crucial to have a good handle of this to maximise profitability. The cycle of winning new business always takes time. If you have left your efforts to bring in new work too late, you will inevitably have periods of low revenue. Unlike products which you can sell at a later time and recoup some revenue, if not all, lost consulting time cannot be archived and sold. That is effectively lost.

To ensure an optimum work pipeline, we can use the charge rate to either stick to our margins, because work is plentiful or use discounting effectively to be more competitive than usual in tough market times. We want to be making a decision on them at the correct times (i.e., not stick to higher margins when market is tough or give away margins when not necessary). We are looking at using Backlog (total value of contracts yet to be executed) as a forward measurement for that.

The aim is to look at recording the backlog value three months out and updating the actuals at the end of the month. As we currently do not have a baseline, I do not expect us to be able to use this effectively in the next year. However, once we have built a picture, we should be able to predict with some confidence what it means to be at a certain point in our backlog and what that is likely to mean in terms of likely actual income.

Because we are looking at it three months out, we’re likely to have enough time to win new business to fill up the pipeline if it is looking less than promising. If pipeline is strong, we know we do not need to compromise on margins. There is likely a follow up on this topic this time next year on how this measurement plays out. Hopefully my challenge is not unique to me and the process is helpful for others to reflect on.

I am keen to understand what predictive measurements you have successfully implemented.

Image credit: communicationstuff.com

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2013 in review


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog. Thank you to all the readers and commenters. Hoping to make this a more interactive forum in 2014.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 44,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 16 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Executives Ignore Valuable Employee Actions that They Can’t Measure


Originally posted on HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review:

Does better data mean better employee performance and organizational outcomes? That’s the implication of the current emphasis on big data and the use of metrics in HR, but the answer isn’t an easy “yes.”

To see what I mean, consider your local schools. When teachers are evaluated and paid on the basis of students’ test scores, performance on tests typically improves. The moral: Data works. Long live data!

But research also shows that higher test scores don’t necessarily translate to greater student mastery of the material. In other words, teaching methods that are effective in improving test scores may not be the best for increasing students’ knowledge. The moral: Data doesn’t work. Down with data!

Teaching is a great example of the strengths and shortcomings of data-based performance assessments because, in a sense, teachers are both frontline workers (when actively teaching in the classroom) and executives (when they write lesson…

View original 553 more words

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